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A Sad and Tragic Day for Our Nation – A Response to Jo Ashline

Sad Tragic Day for Our NationSoviet leader Nikita Khrushchev in 1956:

We will take America without firing a shot…We will bury you! We can’t expect the American people to jump from Capitalism to Communism, but we can assist their elected leaders in giving them small doses of Socialism, until they awaken one day to find that they have Communism. We do not have to invade the United States, we will destroy you from within.

Last week Jo Ashline wrote a scolding post that has apparently been wildly popular and touted from the rooftops for it’s insight. But I disagree with her conclusion.

The post describes the day after the 2012 presidential election. Mitt Romney lost and Barrack Obama was elected for a second term. A number or Ms. Ashline’s Facebook “friends” said it was “a sad and tragic day for our nation.” Ms. Ashline was, in her own words, disgusted. This is what she said:

To those who truly believe the Presidential election results are tragic, let me refresh your memory of what tragic really looks like, because it seems so many have clearly forgotten:

This was followed by large, graphic photos of the world trade center ablaze and mid-collapse on September 11, 2001.

That is a perfect example of the logical fallacy of relative privation.

To those unfamiliar with relative privation, it means making something seem better by comparing it to something worse — in this case, something extreme. So let’s try that on for size. 

To those who truly believe children going without food is tragic, let me refresh your memory of what tragic really looks like, because it seems so many have clearly forgotten:

This statement to be followed by pictures of the great Chinese famine or the Holodomor.

To those who truly believe the AIDS epidemic tragic, let me refresh your memory of what tragic really looks like, because it seems so many have clearly forgotten:

This statement to be followed by drawings of the Black Death.

To those who truly believe the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are tragic, let me refresh your memory of what tragic really looks like, because it seems so many have clearly forgotten:

This statement to be followed by pictures from the World War I or World War II.

To those who truly believe 9-11 was tragic, let me refresh your memory of what tragic really looks like, because it seems so many have clearly forgotten:

This statement to be followed by pictures from the Holocaust.

The American Dream isn’t about having your dream house, a sports car, and the best job ever. It’s not about having everything you want. It’s about having the opportunity to make of your life what you can because of the freedom provided by our limited government.

The tragedy of this election is real — even if it doesn’t seem to Ms. Ashline to reach epic proportions.

Until Tuesday night, I still believed that most Americans still truly believed in the real America. The America that was built by our founders based on the Constitution. The America that provided an opportunity for those willing to accept the challenge — and risk — freedom affords.

My folks were born in the 1920s. Neither came from money. They worked hard and struggled together. My dad finally finished his PhD in 1968 — when he was 39 years old — and started his career as a math professor. We had what we needed, but we lived frugally and saved and wore things out and used wisely.

Have you ever seen Cinderella Man? That was the generation my parents came from. You might — perhaps, maybe, possibly — accept charity (or government assistance or whatever you want to call it). If there were no other way. If you were destitute. If your children were in harm’s way. But you’d do it grudgingly, painfully. And you’d pay it back the very first minute you could. Because it was your duty to care for you own if it was possible at all.

That’s how I was raised. And that’s the community I grew up in.

The Americans I knew would have been horrified at The Life of Julia. They would have been insulted at the insinuation that they were incapable of growing up and having a meaningful life without Nanny Obama coddling and protecting them from cradle to grave.

Sure, there are always people who clamor for “Obama cash” and demand “Obama phones.” And there are people who actually believe the POTUS will pay their mortgage and fill their tanks with gas. There will always be a handful of folks who are able-bodied but expect the rest of the world to provide them a living. (I know, I have one brother who’s in that category.) But they are few and far between.

Or at least I thought they were.

Until Tuesday, I believed that most people in America were like my parents. Late Tuesday night I realized I was wrong. I am in the minority. OK, so I have red hair and I’m a Mormon — I’ve always been in the minority in lots of ways. But  I realized that the American Dream is dying and being subsumed by a more European version of something or other. And most Americans are happily going along with the plan.

  • Most Americans would rather have the “choice” to shred a baby into pieces or — if it’s too big for that — stab it in the skull (while half delivered) and suck it’s brains into a sink, than be, as President Obama said, “punished with a baby.” (Or, as some of us say, “Provide an innocent child with a chance to live.)
  • Most Americans would rather look the other way when four of our patriots are murdered — because doing otherwise might mean they have to pony up with nine bucks every month for their own birth control.
  • Most Americans today would rather have other people (they don’t care who) pay for their educations, than work hard and save and scrimp on their own for something valuable.
  • Most Americans today would rather have government programs care for the needy, than make personal sacrifice.
  • Most Americans today would rather have the security of being provided for, than take the risk that comes from trying to achieve greatness.
  •  Most Americans don’t notice that much of the world can “afford” to be socialist (even though many countries are are bankrupt) because non-socialist America protects them.
  • Most Americans don’t care that history shows that expanding government very rarely contracts — and usually only in disastrous and revolutionary circumstances. As long as they get their stuff.
  • Most Americans don’t want to hear that freedoms lost incrementally can cascade quickly into a country you won’t even recognize.
Is this election a holocaust, Ms. Ashline? No. But I believe it is the tipping point. We have just demonstrably crossed over from the America of honorable adults I grew up with, to one I don’t even know. And that is a tragedy, indeed.

{ 14 comments… add one }

  • Steve T. November 11, 2012, 7:03 pm

    A well-written post, but you and Jo Ashline both missed the point, in my perspective (and I do not profess to speak for others). To give you some background on me (that perhaps should be irrelevant, but I expect will matter to your evaluation of my post), I am an upper-middle class, white, Christian who has lived my enitire life in the South. I have a college degree and am married with kids. I am proud of what I have worked hard to accomplish and I do believe most people (contrary to many of the sterotyping proclamations you make above in bullet form above) genuinely do want to earn their own living without a hand-out. I simply makes good common sense, Alison. Human beings feel pride not in what they are able to steal or beg, but what they earn what they have. I feel that a growing portion of the country has been force-fed a more devisive lie for political purposes and they have swallowed it whole – having no real, personal experience with people from other walks of life; experience with the people that are being blanketed with this type of hate I speak of. As a Christian, it makes me sick, but I think it should make every citizen sick.

    I agree that Jo Ashline did inapropriately use relative privation to make a point – but from the extreme Facebook posts I saw following the election, many of which used the same technique, it was a point worth making. To think that this great country will fall (or even “tip” toward failure) from a single or a series of elections is naive. This country has evolved many times over its history and we will continue to. In fact, we MUST if we intend to remain relavent and the best country in the World. Those who would claim the things you claimed about the country changing are correct. Again, it must as the World changes. Some simply want things the way they remember it. But the way they remember it is not the way things are today for a growing proportion of America. The percentage of poor are growing, not shinking under the “trickle-down” aproaches. The rich are getting richer and not all are “earning” their additional wealth in the sense that you talk about it, but rather through tax loophooles and predatory investment strategies. The country has, again, always evolved (need I mention that neither of you ladies would have even had the right to vote before 1920) and it’s a damn good thing we have.

    I was a proud card-carrying Republican all my life until fairly recently, but I realy think they’ve lost their way. I have witnessed (along with the rest of you) the greatest divide being created in this coutry since the Vietnam War. I believe that we are truly much closer to the same than we are different (despite the news shows screaming otherwise), but it profits some to convince us otherwise and allow us to fight it out like so many gaged animals. I long for a time when “compromise” is not a bad word and folks can see their commonalities before they work out their differences. In short, I hope for a day when we can all treat each other as we would want to be treated. Only then will this country retain the claim of the best country in the World.

  • Casey November 11, 2012, 8:04 pm

    Bullshit. Get over yourself, really. It’s embarrassing to read from an otherwise intelligent individual.

  • Alison Moore Smith November 11, 2012, 10:35 pm

    Steve T., thanks for your thoughtful reply. Trust me, I’m not a republican loyalist, either. I was registered unaffiliated (“independent” is a party of it’s own here in Utah (or was when I switched)). But I switched back in 2008 so I could vote in the primary. I’m conservative, libertarianesque.

    I feel that a growing portion of the country has been force-fed a more devisive lie for political purposes and they have swallowed it whole – having no real, personal experience with people from other walks of life; experience with the people that are being blanketed with this type of hate I speak of.

    As mentioned above, I do have real experience. My brother, Robbie. He is 50 years old and hasn’t worked a day in his life since his mid 20s. He has kids scattered around the country, from various women (some past wives, some not). He supports none of them. He divorced his second wife — while continuing to live with her — “because we get two welfare checks instead of one.”

    I have served as the president of the women’t organization in my church, where I was responsible for welfare distribution and served in numerous positions with youth in a variety of socio-economic circumstances for over a decade.

    One of my best friends years ago showed me through the morass of welfare manipulations that were the norm in her culture. How to have a baby “for free.” How to get citizenship for children. How to get “free” toys for her kids. How to get more food stamps than typical and resell them.

    She had just joined my church. For nearly an entire year she’d start telling me about the scam she was working through, then would stop short. “I bet Mormons don’t do that, do they?”

    “Common sense” morality wasn’t taught in her culture. In fact, it was a continual surprise to her to look at things from a moral frame. It was fascinating to see her try to reframe her perception to an ethical one that considered the impact of her decisions and that taught her to CARE about that impact.

    I have three kids in college and three at home. My kids pay for their own schooling — by design. When this comes up, it always causes an argument. Why? People sincerely believe that no one can go to college without government handouts and they will argue until the cows come home that it’s impossible. Most back down when I show them actual numbers, but in every case will still say something like, “Well, it’s POSSIBLE for SOME people, but it’s so hard that it does the students a disservice.”

    I have experience with dozens and dozens of college kids who get grants and still whine and complain that it’s not enough and they deserve more. Look at the riots in California (Berkeley, I think?).

    That is a bill of goods. They’ve been taught crippling rhetoric that says, “you’re incapable and must be taken care of.”

    I served on the PTA and the School Advisory Council in Florida. At one SAC meeting, a teacher noted that the school provided breakfast, lunch, and after child care. She suggested we look at a dinner service so that “frazzled parents” wouldn’t “have to go home and make dinner.”

    I suggested we just set up little cots and wardrobes, so the frazzled parents wouldn’t have to deal with their crumby kids at all. (The teacher was not amused.)

    Watch union members freak at the suggestion that they contribute to their own pensions. Listen to government workers (in my state) complain that they “only” got a 3% cost of living increase — when the rest of the country was lucky to have a job at all.

    Parents scream and yell about how employers should provide them with child care.

    At least once a week for 19 years, someone says something like this, “Why do you kids take classes at Timpanogos, when the bus goes to PG?” As if driving my kids to a better school situation is an unbearable burden.

    My 15-year-old takes performing arts classes at a charter high school. I personally know at least 12 families who auditioned, but chose not to attend for two reasons:

    (1) no busses provided
    (2) no school lunch provided

    Because packing a lunch for your own kid — or buying the ingredients for the kid to make their own lunch — is an unreasonable expectation.

    Liberals give far less to charity, but assuage their guilt by funding social programs with other people’s money.

    …from the extreme Facebook posts I saw following the election, many of which used the same technique, it was a point worth making.

    I saw disappointment, shock, and fear — on Facebook, in the stock market, and in company hiring — when the reelection was sure. But nothing extreme. And note, Ashline’s “disgust” was because people had posted that it was “a sad and tragic day for our nation.”

    Throwing some related privation back at ya.

    Romney had repeated threats of rioting and assassination. Senior citizens were dropping f-bombs and making verbal threats of bodily harm from their wheel chairs. (Michael Moore and MoveOn, classy to the end.) A six-year-old who made a conservative video received death threats.

    Given those, I’d hardly think the words “a sad and tragic day in our nation” should be seen as incredibly problematic.

    To think that this great country will fall (or even “tip” toward failure) from a single or a series of elections is naive.

    When people start getting something from the government, it almost never reverses. People scream and cry and riot. Even in Greece, where the economy has collapsed, people are rioting and looting and burning — because they want their stuff.

    Steve T., I don’t believe this election is causing America to fail. I believe this election is an indicator that we have gone irretrievably far down the Socialist path.

    I think it’s utterly naive to believe that “a series of elections” and the subsequent policies, don’t tip the country one way or the other. And, as Khrushchev said, we are happily taking one small step at a time. At some point, the accumulation of those steps means something.

    In fact, we MUST if we intend to remain relavent and the best country in the World. Those who would claim the things you claimed about the country changing are correct. Again, it must as the World changes.

    America is the world superpower. To claim that in order to remain “relevant” we must follow the path of inferior, weaker, less productive, less innovative, collapsing countries is nonsensical.

    Some simply want things the way they remember it.

    I’m not longing for the real American Dream because of some misplaced sense of nostalgia. I’m longing for it because that mentality is what made America the superpower to begin with. The principles espoused by the Constitution are what made America rise.

    At the founding of our country, we weren’t looking for some nebulous international relevancy. We were looking for freedom. It was that freedom that forced the other cultures to become relevant to us.

    But the way they remember it is not the way things are today for a growing proportion of America.

    Could you give some specifics of what you mean? The way I “remember it” is people working hard and being responsible. In that sense, yes, you’re right. It’s not that way for a growing proportion of America.

    The percentage of poor are growing, not shinking under the “trickle-down” aproaches.

    I find this categorization fairly useless. When we were in grad school — with two kids — we lived well below the poverty line. We had a small apartment (small by US standards, not by most others), a (used) car, a TV, two computers (and this was in the 80s!), two mountain bikes, rice and beans and raman. We even went out to the dollar theater once in a while or for fast food with a two for one coupon.

    The rich are getting richer and not all are “earning” their additional wealth in the sense that you talk about it, but rather through tax loophooles and predatory investment strategies.

    Steve T., I’m a huge proponent of the Fair Tax. And I’m an accountant! The tax code is utterly idiotic. So I’m all for making it simple and straight forward. You think Obama will go for that?

    What specific tax issues do you have a problem with?

    Let’s note that Romney wanted tax reform and rewrites. Obama wants higher taxes, and not just on the rich.
    Alison Moore Smith recently posted…3 Work at Home Productivity SecretsMy Profile

  • Alison Moore Smith November 11, 2012, 10:37 pm

    Casey, thanks for noting my intelligence. Also, thanks for providing fodder for my upcoming column on ad hominem. Progressives have made it an art.
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  • Cynthia L. November 11, 2012, 11:40 pm

    Hi Alison,

    I can certainly empathize with your sense of despair. I’ve been there–losing an election when you just cannot fathom why your countrymen/women would vote for the other guy. Grief is an emotion everyone is entitled to in such a situation.

    So I’m offering a few thoughts in hopes that they will actually help assuage your grief. To put some things in perspective that maybe things aren’t as bad as they seem, or, at least, not for the reasons you might have thought.

    (1) To the extent that we are in dire budget straits, Obama is not the one who put us there, and seems to be doing an ok job stabilizing things or slowing the hemorrhage, even if not yet turning it around. Here is a helpful video explaining the source of current deficits:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LcvLHHMC4iI

    Here is the same thing in a simple graph, if you don’t have time for a whole video:
    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/ezra-klein/wp/2012/08/28/republican-national-convention-the-one-graph-you-need-to-see-before-watching/

    You said on your other blog’s post that you apologize to your children for not leaving them a better future. It’s an apology all of us should be making to the next generation, but the timing would have been better if the apologies had come for electing Bush and allowing his wars and tax cuts to happen.

    (2) You talked about your parents, and the Cinderella Man generation. Indeed, we have a lot to learn from them. For example, the top marginal tax rate through your parent’s prime years (years when their demographic was controlling the vote and dictating this kind of thing) was 90%. It is now 35%. Seems like our parents and grandparents–the Greatest Generation–had a sense of “to whom much is given much is required” that is deeply admirable, but which some today would malign as “socialism” or “redistribution.” I don’t find much honor in maligning policies today that the Greatest Generation found to be sound.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Historical_Mariginal_Tax_Rate_for_Highest_and_Lowest_Income_Earners.jpg

    And do we need to worry that Obama is drowning us all in taxes? Not according to any sense of perspective from history. Not only are top marginal tax rates dramatically lower (as the above chart shows), but overall taxes are lower, as a percentage of GDP, than they’ve been in decades.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:USTaxRevenue1945-2011.jpeg

    If Obama is trying to tax us into oblivion to support a communist state, he’s doing a terrible job of it. So if nothing else, that total failure on his part to actually enact anything that looks like communism should help assuage your grief. (After you process your grief, you might even realize that the whole thing about him being communist was just baloney to begin with–but if you can’t believe that now, just see that the facts show he’s failing at being a his communist self.)

    Here’s an article that kind of sums it all up: http://www.star-telegram.com/2012/11/07/4395458/obamas-really-a-moderate-republican.html

    Obama’s reelection is only impending doom if all the worst conspiracy theories and slanders about him are true (Kenyan Muslim out to destroy capitalism, government takeover of healthcare, taking away everybody’s guns, building concentration camps in the US where FEMA will relocate conservatives, etc, etc.). The good news is, none of that is true. So once that reality starts to sink in, I think you’ll find that you’ll weather the next 4 years just fine. Maybe not everything will go the way you would have liked, and no doubt we still have a bunch of budget cleanup to do from the mess Bush left, but–overall–chin up. It will be ok.

  • Michael J. Snider November 12, 2012, 9:58 am

    Let us pay no heed to Ms. Ashline’s semantic jiujitsu. Defining words narrowly while using pictures to magnify the illusion is a magician’s trick. Her misdirection is designed to make others think their perspective is skewed instead of making a rational argument to express her “disgust.” Don’t pay attention to the puffs of picture-smoke, keep your eye on the rabbit. In this case, the plain definitions and meanings of English words like tragic:

    Jo’s pictures depict only the 3rd definition of “tragic” that appears in most dictionaries:
    “dreadful, calamitous, disastrous, or fatal: a tragic event.”

    Let’s look at the primary definition of “tragic”:
    “characteristic or suggestive of tragedy: tragic solemnity.”

    Of course that doesn’t tell us much, so let’s look at the primary definition of the word “tragedy”:
    “a dramatic composition, often in verse, dealing with a serious or somber theme, typically that of a great person destined through a flaw of character or conflict with some overpowering force, as fate or society, to downfall or destruction.”

    Thus, Obama’s election can certainly be defined as tragic in the sense that many see what just happened in America as a conflict leading to a downfall.

    Ms. Ashline is of course entitled to her opinion about others’ posts, but she is not entitled to redefine the English language in order to make her points. IMHO just adding the question “Really?” to question someone’s word usage is just rhetorical laziness.

  • Oak November 12, 2012, 6:28 pm

    Take a xanax, a nap, and come up for air. Our economy is based on A) spending money we do not have and B) using war as a means of keeping the national economy moving forward.
    Neither is a good plan. Lets move to the center and reason together. By the way, corporate america runs this country through its paid for politicians. You and I are secondary to their interests.

  • Marilyn Armstrong November 14, 2012, 1:57 am

    Losing an election is not a tragedy. It’s a disappointment. Your guy lost. Deal with it. Stop being such a bunch of cry babies. If you rethink your position, stop letting the religious right run your party and move back to the middle where Americans feel comfortable, you could recoup and win next time. And there will be a next time. Doom saying, railing and carrying on is childish and embarrassing. It just makes you look like a bunch of bratty children. This country is strong. We survive, we pull ourselves together, and fix stuff that’s broken. Stop whining and start helping to make things better. The next big election is in 4 years. Get your act together, find a real candidate and maybe it will be your turn, but not if you run another jerk like Romney. It boggles my mind that you’d nominate this less than one term pathetic excuse for a governor, a man who knows nothing about governing and has no principals … and try to foist him off as presidential material. Is he really the best the GOP has to offer? If that’s the case, it is a tragedy.

  • Alison Moore Smith November 14, 2012, 11:58 am

    Cynthia L., thanks for your comment.

    I want to be clear, my “despair” is not over losing an election. My chosen candidates lose as often as they win. That’s life when I only get one vote. My “despair” comes from the reasons I included at the end. And, please, don’t patronize me about working through the grief process. Ack.

    You said on your other blog’s post that you apologize to your children for not leaving them a better future. It’s an apology all of us should be making to the next generation, but the timing would have been better if the apologies had come for electing Bush and allowing his wars and tax cuts to happen.

    You assume that my concern just began on November 6? I did vote for Bush. Not because I was an avid supporter — far from it. It was during the Bush term that I change my affiliation to unaffiliated, away from the Republican party. But because the alternative was Al Gore, for heaven’s sake. And while I was not an Obama supporter, I also did not support John McCain (sheesh).

    Point being that obviously a country doesn’t move from being on completely sound footing in the middle of the plateau to tumbling down the sheer cliff on the edge in one day. Obviously the movement has been ongoing to some extent. We had to get close enough ideologically for Obama’s positions to be accepted.

    The apology came NOW because it is NOW that I don’t see a possible path back. I have been speaking about this for years in a non-partison way. But it is only now that I see a fundamental change in America that cannot revert to fiscal sanity, to constitutional principles, to a moral base. Because the PEOPLE don’t want to go there. The PEOPLE want stuff more than they want freedom and, frankly, they don’t give a crap where that takes the country. They don’t care if their KIDS are in bondage because of their choices. They don’t think they will personally have to deal with the outcome of all this. They’ll get their stuff and get out. Their kids can deal with it. Whatever.

    If you see a path back, I’m all ears. If you have historical examples of socialized countries that returned to representative republics — without calamity and revolution — please show me how they did it. I want a model. But I can’t find one. I can’t even find significant examples of people willing to give up public pools or school lunch, let alone an entitlement lifestyle.

    You talked about your parents, and the Cinderella Man generation. Indeed, we have a lot to learn from them. For example, the top marginal tax rate through your parent’s prime years (years when their demographic was controlling the vote and dictating this kind of thing) was 90%.

    If you took my discussion of my parent’s generation to mean that I have no disagreements with them, I’m sorry to have been unclear. My point about them was the only point being made. Generally speaking, they were a generation who understood the value of self-reliance and were hard-pressed to take things others earned.

    I have another post, uncompleted, expressing my disgust for the seniors who are completely unwilling to take an responsibility for the insolvency of the programs they voted for and supported all their lives. So I’ll save that discussion for later, if you don’t mind. Suffice it to say, giving one example of a positive shouldn’t be seen as a blanket endorsement of any/all decisions made by a person/generation. (Can we say “FDR”?)

    …you might even realize that the whole thing about him being communist was just baloney to begin with…

    I haven’t described Obama as a Communist. His teaching and mentoring was more socialist/Marxist, but the labels mean little to me. The only thing in the OP references communism is the Khrushchev quote. Note that his point is that people are indoctrinated in socialism, bits at a time, until the leap is easy.

    Obama’s reelection is only impending doom if all the worst conspiracy theories and slanders about him are true (Kenyan Muslim out to destroy capitalism, government takeover of healthcare, taking away everybody’s guns, building concentration camps in the US where FEMA will relocate conservatives)

    “Conspiracy theories”? The “impending doom” you describe is already here. Obama is no friend to capitalism. He’s clear about that. (I don’t give a flip about his religion or ethnicity, irrelevant.) He hopes to move to single payer. He’s been clear about that and of course Obamacare is a step toward government “takeover” of health care. He’s no friend to gun owners. Is this disputable?

    But none of those is explicitly necessary. Obama is a radical leftist. The progressive movement is, at it’s core, a movement of government solutions. And when the solution comes from the government, freedom is lost. And you are at the mercy of the government and dependent on the goodwill of those who are in power.

    Getting free stuff, being taken care of, is not worth the risk. And those supporting this agenda won’t realize or admit it until/unless (1) it hurts them personally and/or (2) it’s too late.
    Alison Moore Smith recently posted…How to Link to a Comment with WordPress Comment PermalinksMy Profile

  • Alison Moore Smith November 14, 2012, 12:49 pm

    Oak, I quibble with the definition of “based.” Does war spending put money into the system? Sure. All spending does. Do we spend more than we have? Yes, but it certainly doesn’t help us long term. Xanax won’t change that.
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  • Alison Moore Smith November 14, 2012, 12:58 pm

    Losing an election is not a tragedy. It’s a disappointment.

    Of course this is untrue, as a general statement. The tragedy (or lack thereof) is entirely dependent on who is elected and what it means.

    Your guy lost. Deal with it. Stop being such a bunch of cry babies.

    While I appreciate that you’ve added more content for my ad hominem post, I wonder why liberals are so practiced at pulling out that tactic. It often seems to be the only one in the bag. You know it doesn’t actually make a cogent point, right?

    That aside, are you telling me, in all seriousness, to “move on,” while Obama STILL blames Bush for everything that is happening?

    If you rethink your position, stop letting the religious right run your party and move back to the middle where Americans feel comfortable, you could recoup and win next time.

    While I don’t actually expect you to show up to defend your statements, I welcome it. Please tell me exactly what positions from the “religious right” that you think should be abandoned to make people more “comfortable.” I assume you might be talking about, oh, stabbing babies in the head and sucking their brains out? Or are there other “extreme” positions you don’t like.
    Alison Moore Smith recently posted…How to Link to a Comment with WordPress Comment PermalinksMy Profile

  • graceforgrace December 5, 2012, 8:06 pm

    Alison,

    I felt the exact same way you did after the elections. I had put time and money into the Romney campaign and it was amazing to see him lose pretty decisively as the night wore on.

    For me what was also appalling was gay marriage and legalizing marijuana passed in my state as well.

    I wrote an article about how to deal with things that I think is helpful in this situation: http://graceforgrace.com/2012/11/09/supporting-leaders-of-our-country

    Also, you do a good job of holding your own. Seems like a lot of people here disagree with you. Good job for standing your ground in a positive yet firm way.

  • Carmen October 10, 2013, 10:07 pm

    Just found this from a link chain through Facebook. Love it. I’ll be linking to this in all this government shutdown whining!

  • Grey Ghost December 27, 2013, 12:15 pm

    Unfortunately, Romney showed no signs of doing anythign substantially different than Obama. He might have had some cosmetic differences (and I’d like to think that some of the excesses of the last year or so might not have happened), but he never gave any indication of any willingness to defuse or disarm the major financial time bombs that are finally going to sink us. It matters little whether we fall off the cliff in 2020 or 2025; at the very best, Romney might have delayed the crash by a few years.
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